Skip to Content

Citizens' Council on Human Relations records

 Collection — Box: 1-26
Identifier: MS 07
The collection contains correspondence, news clippings, policy statements, printed materials, and speech notes, reflecting the actions the Citizens' Council on Human Relations (CCHR) while seeking to end discrimination, particularly against African-Americans, in Buffalo, N.Y.. There are also organizational files, consisting of by-laws, newsletters and membership lists, which reflect the internal workings of CCHR itself.

Dates

  • 1955-1992

Creator

Language of Materials

Collection material in English.

Terms of Access

The Citizens' Council on Human Relations Records are open for research.

Copyright

Copyright of papers in the collection may be held by their authors, or the authors' heirs or assigns. Researchers must obtain the written permission of the holder(s) of copyright and the University Archives before publishing quotations from materials in the collection. Most papers may be copied in accordance with the library's usual procedures unless otherwise specified.

Extent

10.43 Linear Feet (24 manuscript boxes, 2 half manuscript boxes)

Overview

The collection contains correspondence, news clippings, policy statements, printed materials, and speech notes, reflecting the actions the Citizens' Council on Human Relations (CCHR) while seeking to end discrimination, particularly against African-Americans, in Buffalo, N.Y. There are also organizational files, consisting of by-laws, newsletters and membership lists, which reflect the internal workings of CCHR itself.

Historical Note

The Citizens Council on Human Relations (CCHR) was incorporated as a non-profit organization on September 19, 1963. Newton Garver was one of the 30 original directors and a signer of the certificate of incorporation, and was the first Executive Secretary. At the time of incorporation, some of CCHR's stated purposes included: "to foster and promote improvement of relations between minority groups and the community at large," "to prevent discrimination against persecution of any person," "to work toward equal opportunity for all citizens, regardless of race or creed, in employment, housing," "to work toward equal access to services for all," and "to foster integration in educational institutions throughout the Niagara Frontier."

In February 1964, a brochure summarized these purposes in one aim: "to deal sensibly and urgently with a problem which has become a national crisis - that of the demand of Negro and other minority groups to share fully in the life of their city, state and nation." At the same time, CCHR explained its method: "to investigate areas where minorities do not participate fully, to find out why not, and to bring about harmonious solutions strengthening the fabric of the whole community."

Membership in CCHR is open to any citizens of New York State. It is governed by a board of 30 directors, through its executive officers and an executive committee. In addition to a Ways and Means Committee, which deals with finance and public relations, there are three standing committees: education - which works at furthering integration, improving educational opportunities and stimulating school programs which foster better human relations; employment - which seeks to expand the range of job opportunities open to African-American and other minority groups; and housing - which seeks to ensure that members of minority groups can live where they choose.

The Council meets at least once annually; the board of directors at least quarterly. The officers consist of two co-Chairmen, an Executive Secretary, a Corresponding Secretary, and a Treasurer.

Arrangement

This collection is arranged in four series: I. Papers donated by Newton Garver, as Executive Secretary; II. Papers donated by Norman Goldfarb, Director, and former Co-Chairman; III. Papers donated by Abel Fink; and IV. Additional papers.

Acquisition Information

The majority of this collection was donated by Norman Goldfarb (Citizens' Council on Human Relations Records Director and former Co-Chairman) over a period of twelve years. Material was accessioned by the University Archives on April 18, 1969, July 18, 1973, October 26, 1973, March 13, 1975, and July 1, 1981. Additional material was received from Newton Garver (Citizens' Council on Human Relations Records Executive Secretary) on February 6, 1968 and from Able K. Funk (Buffalo State College professor) on May 12, 1992.

Accruals and Additions

No further accruals are expected to this collection.

Related Resources

MS 7, Citizens Council on Human Relations records, 1955-1992
MS 15, Lydia T. Wright papers, 1883-1968
MS 59, Sarah Simmons papers on school desegregation in Buffalo, N.Y.,1977-1980
MS 178, John T. Curtin papers Re: Arthur v. Nyquist, 1982-2006
MS 103, David G. Jay files Re: Arthur v. Nyquist, 1972-1996
MS 104, Buffalo School Desegregation collection
MS 106, Joseph Manch papers, ca. 1930s-1980s

Processing Information

Collection processed by Archives staff. Additional material processed and finding aid updated by Sarah Pinard, fall 2015.
Finding aid encoded by Danielle White, January 2015.

Creator

Source

Title
Finding Aid for the Citizens' Council on Human Relations records
Status
completed
Author
Finding aid prepared by Archives staff.
Date
2006
Description rules
dacs
Language of description
und

Repository Details

Part of the University Archives Repository

Contact:
420 Capen Hall
Buffalo New York 14260-1674 US
716-645-2916
716-645-3714 (Fax)